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A small viper, growing up to 49 cm (Flower, 1933), but mostly between 30 and 35 cm in most cases. Females are significant larger and stouter than males. Scales strongly keeled, which gives a more rough and rugose appearance in contrast to Cerastes cerastes. Three, sometimes four scales between the eye and the supralabials (Schleich et al., 1996). Strauch (1869) examined twelve Avicenna vipers, ten out of had four rows of Suboculars. Body colour beige, brown to orange-red, last coloration especially in the most western part of their distribution. Only fairly marked, except in the coastal areas of southwestern Morocco and Western Sahara, where individuals with contrasting pattern, blue-grey marks and uniformly orange eyes are typical. There is a sexual dimorphsm (dichromatism), females have black tails, while these are in the same colour as the body in males, only getting darker to the tip (Marx, 1958). Adults average 20–35 cm (8-14 inches) in total length (body + tail), with a maximum total length of 50 cm (1.6 ft). Females are larger than males.3 Small and stout, it has a broad, triangular head with small eyes set well forward and situated on the junction of the side and the top of the head.

Heritage

A small viper, growing up to 49 cm (Flower, 1933), but mostly between 30 and 35 cm in most cases. Females are significant larger and stouter than males. Scales strongly keeled, which gives a more rough and rugose appearance in contrast to Cerastes cerastes. Three, sometimes four scales between the eye and the supralabials (Schleich et al., 1996). Strauch (1869) examined twelve Avicenna vipers, ten out of had four rows of Suboculars. Body colour beige, brown to orange-red, last coloration especially in the most western part of their distribution. it has a broad, triangular head with small eyes set well forward and situated on the junction of the side and the top of the head.

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